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Friday, May 20, 2022

May 20, 2022

HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR SURGICAL CLOTHING TEST MONITORS SURGEONS’ CONCENTRATION

The UK medical sector has been abuzz with talk of workwear-related issues in recent weeks, following the strict new dress code policy from the NHS that affects doctors, nurses, and non-uniform staff. Of course, any surgeon at work in an operating theatre will understand the importance of surgical clothing, so while appropriate hemlines and hairstyles may be up for debate outside the operating theatre, there can be no compromise on the protective medical clothing worn when a surgical procedure is underway.

To protect surgeons and patients alike, surgical theatre clothing shields the wearer against bacteria and blood while allowing for maximum freedom of movement. But is it possible that the type of clothing worn during a painstaking surgical operation could affect the concentration and performance of a healthcare professional? A recent medical study yielded some interesting results…

While some hospitals require surgeons to wear disposable clothing that is destroyed after use, others require reusable surgical uniforms that undergo a rigorous cleaning process. A team of researchers from the Hohenstein Institute set out to determine which option is more beneficial to surgeons and therefore better for patient safety.

The study examined several volunteers who were required to perform a demanding microsurgical task in a simulated operating theatre. While some volunteers wore disposable surgical clothing, others donned reusable medical clothing for the task. The researchers measured each volunteer’s reaction time, error rate, and multitasking capabilities. They found that on average, volunteers wearing high-quality reusable surgical clothing performed better than those wearing disposable clothes.

The results show that even a factor as simple as the type of workwear trousers worn during challenging tasks can have a significant effect on the wearer’s capabilities. This surgical clothing study points to a brand-new factor that could make a small but crucial difference during surgical procedures. The results could also have implications for clothing systems in other industries where the highest levels of concentration are required daily.

HSE GUIDELINES-FOR SURGICAL CLOTHING TEST MONITORS SURGEONS’ CONCENTRATION

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HSE GUIDELINES-FOR SURGICAL CLOTHING TEST MONITORS SURGEONS’ CONCENTRATION



Wednesday, May 18, 2022

May 18, 2022

WHAT ARE THE UK FOOTWEAR SAFETY STANDARDS?

Following Health and Safety Regulations, employers owe a duty of care to their employers and are thus permitted to supply them with proper safety footwear. There are many industries that expose their employees to hazardous work conditions and the manufacturers of safety boots make specific footwear accordingly.

The manufacturers of safety footwear are also bound by law to give a thorough and accurate description of their products so only purchase items that have a complete product description. Before safety footwear can be put on sale, it must be tested to ensure they meet the requirements for the specific purpose they are designed to achieve.

European standards testing is controlled by EN ISO conditions, namely for safety footwear (ISO20345), protective footwear (ISO20346), and occupational footwear (ISO20347). Once the tested footwear is approved it will be certified and tagged with a CE label. Manufacturers are also responsible for providing information detailing uses that the footwear is not suitable for.

Types of safety footwear that are regulated

Fortunately, there is a wide choice of safety footwear available on the market that are suitable for use across all industries. The types of regulated footwear include waterproof, ankle protection and foot support, steel toecaps, uneven terrain, abrasion, temperature extremes, corrosive substances, puncture hazards, electrical shock, and any other recognizable hazard.

The only type of footwear that is not covered under European ISO safety measures is slip resistance – although there is a directive under US law. The European standards consider slip-resistant footwear a basic requirement, principally because we don´t have materials that can be used to make footwear to prevent slipping – only to reduce the risk.

The assessment of safety standards in footwear is based on the work conditions –and in the event of an accident the conditions in the workplace at the time of the accident. Therefore, an employer can reduce the risk of an accident by providing safe working conditions for your employees following what performance the safety footwear gives you.

Deciding which safety footwear to use

Due to the wide selection of safety footwear, the employer must determine the most appropriate protection based on the working conditions. If there is a risk of injury through falling debris, for example, the ankles of your employees need protection as much as their feet.

Choosing the most suitable footwear for a particular environment or work activity can pose problems in some cases and a study of the manufacturer´s product description should be read carefully. Using the slip resistance example earlier, a product description that reads “improving the grip performance,” does not mean it will prevent the wearer from slipping. If on the other hand, a product description reads “slip-resistant” there is a chance the manufacturer can be held partly liable in the event of an accident.

Meeting safety standards when purchasing footwear for your employees is a legal duty you are obligated to fulfill thus the selection of the appropriate safety boots should be researched thoroughly.

 WHAT ARE THE UK FOOTWEAR SAFETY STANDARDS?

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May 18, 2022

HARD HAT REGULATIONS IN THE UK

Anybody who works in an environment that presents a risk of head injury is required to wear a hard hat. There are various types of hard hats and it is the responsibility of the employer to provide employees with suitable protective helmets that meet the standards for the requirements of the work environment.

Hard hats were originally introduced at the end of the 19th Century for the safety of miners, but they were not made compulsory to wear on building sites in the UK until almost a century later. Today they are used in any industry where head injuries can occur.

The laws concerning the wearing of hard hats in the UK are illustrated in The Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989, but other occupations should also be considered where there is a foreseeable risk of head injury. These include, tradesmen, fitters, assemblers, packers, wrappers, sawyers, welders, laborers, freight handlers, timber cutting, and warehouse laborers should also be routinely considered.

When should hard hats be worn?

Hard hats must be worn whenever there is a foreseeable risk of head injury. The decision is left to the discretion of the employer who must determine when, where and how safety helmet gear should be worn. In certain working environments designated “hard hat” signs must also be erected.

Employees and self-employed contractors must also adhere to regulations and are bound by the rules of their employer or the site. When hard hats are not provided on-site, self-employed contractors must provide their own.

The only exception to the rule of hard hats as determined by the Health and Safety Executive in the UK applies to turban-wearing Sikhs. The regulations under this category have been withdrawn and are no longer considered current. Sikhs who refuse to wear provided safety helmets when asked to do so, do it at their own risk with no liability on the employer.

Maintenance of safety helmets

The regulations also state employees are responsible for ensuring that their safety helmet is kept in sound working condition. They should not be misused or worn improperly such as reversed with the peak backward like a baseball cap and any defects should be reported immediately.  

Other maintenance requirements are:

  1. An absorbent sweatband that is easy to clean or replace
  2. Textile cradle straps
  3. Chin straps (when fitted) that fit around the ears and are fitted with smooth, quick-release buckles which don’t dig into the skin.

A hard hat should not hinder the work being carried out. If vision is restricted, the helmet is ill-fitting, chin straps are not provided or the hard hat is not compatible with other safety equipment such as ear defenders employers could be liable for damages in the event of an injury.

 HARD HAT REGULATIONS IN THE UK

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HARD HAT REGULATIONS IN THE UK



May 18, 2022

DIFFERENT TYPES OF FIRE SUPPRESSION

Most people tend to know the basics of fire safety and what to do in case of an emergency. Having fire extinguishers handy and ensuring no flammable materials are left in a place where they can catch fire are the simplest steps you can take to ensure your safety – but there is another type of fire prevention that can prove invaluable in the workplace.

Fire Suppression Systems.  

The beauty of this type of system is that rather than working to counteract fire after one has started, they work to either prevent the cause of blazes as well as automatically stop fire without the need for human intervention.

Probably the most well-known fire suppression system is the sprinkler system. Installed in kitchens, warehouses, and offices, the sprinkler system will trip when a fire starts and release water to effectively smother the blaze while limiting the damage.

Cost-effective perhaps, but the problem with sprinkler systems is two-fold.  No doubt they are effective but they can’t be used in places like server rooms or places with an abundance of electrical goods, and while they are certainly a fire suppression system, they are still reactionary; even with technological developments over the past two decades have given rise to fast-action systems.

This is where it starts to get a bit more interesting. A great way to cut the damage caused by fire by stopping it at the source is a Hypoxic air fire suppression system. These effectively work by cutting the fuel that allows fires to wreak havoc; oxygen.

By taking the oxygen level in a room down to around 15% fire is unable to start because there is not enough oxygen present to help accelerate it. This won’t have any effect on the contents of the room or people as well, but will effectively cut down on the chances of a potentially ruinous fire breaking out.

Sensors used in this system continuously monitor oxygen levels in the protected area, ensuring that if they dip below the required level, more oxygen can be pumped back in.

Inert gasses are another great example of a fire suppression system. Nitrogen, Argon, and Carbon Dioxide are used to cut the chances of a fire breaking out in an environment. Think of a light bulb in your house; there is an extremely hot burning filament inside the bulb and yet it doesn’t catch fire because it is surrounded by an inert gas.

These are just a few examples of fire suppression systems that could be invaluable in your workplace, be it an office, warehouse, IT facility, or elsewhere. There are plenty of other examples of fire suppression and fire protection systems that may be the best fit for your business.

Fire has a huge capacity to cause serious damage to a workplace or business as a whole. It is now more important than ever to do more to protect yourself and indeed be proactive against it. With fire more than anything else, prevention is infinitely better than reaction.

 DIFFERENT TYPES OF FIRE SUPPRESSION

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Monday, May 16, 2022

May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORKING AT HEIGHT–ROOFS & FRAGILE SURFACES

The following documents for the risk assessment "Working At Height–roofs & Fragile Surfaces" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

Use of low-level mobile tower scaffold

Consequences

Operative/s working at height on roofs / fragile surfaces - Failure to take additional precautions when working on roofs or fragile surfaces may lead to operatives falling with possibly fatal consequences

Control Measures

  1. Suitable means of access to the work area to be provided.
  2. Work on roofs to be assessed for the safest, most suitable means of access to the work area, e.g., consider using MEWPS, etc.
  3. If using roof ladders or planks etc., they must be adequately supported and accompanied by suitable guardrails and edge protection.
  4. Operatives should NOT access fragile roofs without a safe system of access.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORKING AT HEIGHT–ROOFS & FRAGILE SURFACES

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May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORK AT HEIGHT – LOW-LEVEL MOBILE TOWER SCAFFOLD

The following documents for the risk assessment "Work At Height – Low-level Mobile Tower Scaffold" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

Use of low-level mobile tower scaffold

Consequences

  1. Worker falling from height due to handrails missing, whilst accessing the working platform, whilst erecting the tower
  2. Materials falling from the working platform onto persons or the ground below

Control Measures

  1. Ensure the tower is erected by competent, trained, certificated persons. Certification to be produced before erection.
  2. The tower is to be checked before use.
  3. The tower is to be tagged to identify it as ‘safe for use’, and the tower is to be inspected by a competent person every week.
  4. The top rail and intermediate rail are in place.
  5. An internal ladder is used to access the working platform. Operatives to alight the tower when moving/hatch closed on the platform.
  6. The exclusion zone is to be erected and signed to prevent access to the work area.
  7. Ensure toe boards are fitted (and correctly secured to the working platform) if the platform is above waist height.
  8. Work platform checked before use and kept tidy to prevent any buildup of materials.
  9. Remove all materials from the platform before moving.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORK AT HEIGHT – LOW-LEVEL MOBILE TOWER SCAFFOLD

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RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORK AT HEIGHT – LOW-LEVEL MOBILE TOWER SCAFFOLD



May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORKING AT HEIGHT–LADDERS/STEPLADDERS

The following documents for the risk assessment "Working At Height–ladders/stepladders" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

  • The falls from a ladder.
  • Working from an unstable ladder. 
  • Working from a ladder erected at the wrong angle.
  • Falls from stepladders due to incorrect choice or stepladder or incorrect working technique may lead to falls.

Consequences

  1. Operative – falling from a ladder due to unsafe working practices may lead to serious or fatal injuries.
  2. Operative - may lead to falls.
  3. Operative falling from a height.

Control Measures

  1. Ladders are to be used only for short-duration work when no other means of access is feasible.
  2. Ladders to be checked before use.
  3. No over-reaching when working from the ladder – get down and reposition it.
  4. Three points of contact are to be maintained when working from a ladder.
  5. Ladders to be checked before use.
  6. Ladders are to be erected on a firm base and secured at the top.
  7. Ladder angle to be one unit out at the foot to four units in height.
  8. Consideration is to be given to the use of podium-type stepladders.
  9. Three points of contact are to be maintained when working from a stepladder.
  10. Stepladders to be checked before use.
  11. A handhold must be available.
  12. No over-reaching or exerting sideways pressure.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WORKING AT HEIGHT–LADDERS & STEPLADDERS


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May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STORAGE AND MANOEUVRING OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

The following documents for the risk assessment "Storage And Manoeuvring Of Materials And Equipment" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

  • Unloading / Loading of materials or equipment
  • Transporting and handling materials /equipment to work areas around the site

Consequences

  1. Operatives manual handling goods or being hit via other site traffic.
  2. Persons falling from delivery vehicles
  3. Operatives and other site users – contact with load slips, trips, and falls
  4. contact with substances overloading work area

Control Measures

  1. Check the existing environment and route before materials are transported/moved/handled.
  2. Ensure adequate lighting, safe surfaces, adequate width & height, temporary site services, etc.
  3. Co-ordinate planned activities with the Client / Principal
  4. Contractor.
  5. Restrict others not involved in the process from the immediate route/area.
  6. Transport materials along the safest route by mechanical means when possible:
  7. Handle and store products following the COSHH
  8. assessment and safety data product sheet/s.
  9. Agree and arrange storage area/s with the Site Supervisor to allow safe access for other site users.  
  10. Do not overload working platforms, consider the maximum loading capacity of – tower scaffolds, independent scaffolding, birdcage scaffold, dead load / live load of floors, etc.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STORAGE AND MANOEUVRING OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

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RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STORAGE AND MANOEUVRING OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT



May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR USE OF HARD, WHITE TALLOW AS THREAD CUTTING LUBRICANT

The following documents for the risk assessment "Use Of Hard, White Tallow As Thread Cutting Lubricant" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

Working with hard, white tallow

Consequences

  1. Operatives – burns from the liquefied Substances when hot. 
  2. Ingestion of substance

Control Measures

  1. Under normal use, the heat produced will be insufficient to raise the temperature to dangerous levels.
  2. Ingestion of solids in small quantities will not produce adverse effects.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR USE OF HARD, WHITE TALLOW AS THREAD CUTTING LUBRICANT

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RISK ASSESSMENT FOR USE OF HARD, WHITE TALLOW AS THREAD CUTTING LUBRICANT



May 16, 2022

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR ENERGISING FINAL SUB-CIRCUITS

The following documents for the risk assessment "Energising Final Sub-circuits" are uploaded for our visitors in an editable and ready-to-use format. Click on the download link given at the end of these points.

Hazards

Energizing final sub-circuits

Consequences

  1. Operatives – electrocution.
  2. Live cables damaged.

Control Measures

  1. Notify site operatives and other site users before circuits are energized.
  2. "Circuits Live," notices to be positioned on site.
  3. Qualifications and competence of all persons carrying out electrical work must be verified by inspection of current qualifications.

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR ENERGISING FINAL SUB-CIRCUITS

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RISK ASSESSMENT FOR ENERGISING FINAL SUB-CIRCUITS